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Table 1 Density, concentration of radiogenic elements, and thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, with the minimum, maximum values and average in parentheses

From: Numerical analysis of the role of radiogenic basement on temperature distribution in the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Québec

Groups \(\rho _r\) (\(\hbox {kg m}^{-3}\)) \(C_U\) (ppm) \(C_{Th}\) (ppm) \(C_K\) (%) k (\(\hbox {W m}^{-1}\hbox { K}^{-1}\))
SR–LO–QT siltstone 2540–2720 (2602) 3.1 10.2 0.05–0.8 (0.24) 1.91–4.1 (2.55)
Utica shale 2700–2710 (2705) 2.59–3.41 (2.9) 2.9–9.8 (7.4) 0.29–3.42 (2.33) 1.93–2.46 (2.36)
TR-BR-Ch limestone 2630–2700 (2680) 0.2–6.6 (1.6) 2.4–4.7 (3.55) 0.04–2.66 (0.67) 2.22–2.98 (2.71)
Beekmantown dolomite 2640–2810 (2717) 0.07–3.08 (2.0) 3–14 (7.5) 0.19–6.26 (2.08) 2.7–4.24 (3.56)
Potsdam sandstone 2540–2640 (2602) 0.4–0.45 (0.43) 1.38–1.4 (1.39) 0.05–2.3 (0.32) 4.77–6.9 (5.91)
  1. Densities of sedimentary rocks are based on measurements of 32 samples by Nasr (2016); averages are in parenthesis. Radiogenic element data are from Owen and Greenough (2008), Pinti et al. (2011), Rivard et al. (2002), Vautour et al. (2015) as well as new ICP–MS and ICP–OES measurements. Thermal conductivity data of sedimentary rocks are from Nasr (2016) and Perozzi et al. (2016)