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Table 2 Thermal properties assigned to the lithostratigraphic units and the range of values tested in the sensitivity study

From: The 3D conductive thermal field of the North Alpine Foreland Basin: influence of the deep structure and the adjacent European Alps

Lithostratigraphic unit Dominant lithology References Thermal conductivity (W/mK) References Radiogenic heat production (W/m3) References
Nördlinger Ries Lacustrine sediments, impact breccia 1 2.1 ± 0.6 1 1 × 10−6 ± 0.5 × 10−6 3
Alpine Body Limestone, dolomite, marl, clay, silt, conglomerate 2 2.2 ± 0.6 3 3 × 10−7 ± 5 × 10−7 3
Folded Molasse Sediments Conglomerate, sand, silt, clay 2 2.1 ± 0.6 7 1 × 10−6 ± 0.2 × 10−6 3
Foreland Molasse Sediments Conglomerate, sand, silt, clay 2 2.1 ± 0.6 7 1 × 10−6 ± 0.3 × 10−6 3
Cretaceous Claystone, limestone 2 2.4 ± 0.5 7 1.4 × 10−6 ± 0.3 × 10−6 3
Upper Jurassic Malm Limestone, dolomite 2 2.7 ± 0.5 7 1.4 × 10−6 ± 0.4 × 10−6 3
PreMalm Sediments Claystone, sandstone, marl 2 2.7 ± 0.4 7 1 × 10−6 ± 0.6 × 10−6 3
Tauern Body Granite, gneiss, shale 3 2.6 ± 0.8 5 1.8 × 10−6 ± 1 × 10−6 3
Upper crystalline crust Granite/granodiorite 3 3.1 ± 0.7 5 1.8 × 10−6 ± 0.7 × 10−6 3
Lower crystalline crust Gabbro 4 2.7 ± 0.8 5 7 × 10−7 ± 3 × 10−7 3
Lithospheric mantle Peridotite 6 3.0 ± 0.7 5 3 × 10−8 ± 5 × 10−8 3
  1. References: [1] Ernstson and Pohl (1977), [2] Freudenberger and Schwerd (1996), [3] Landolt-Börnstein (1982), [4] Ebbing (2002), [5] Marotta and Splendore (2014), [6] Allen and Allen (2005), [7] Koch et al. (2009)